You are the drug that I can’t quit…♥

"I’m a word freak. I like words. I’ve always compared writing to music. That’s the way I feel about good paragraphs. When it really works, it’s like music."

—Hunter S. Thompson.

“It was the first time I had ever heard her laugh. I watched her face. “You are sweet,” she said. “No, I’m not.”
“Yes. You are a dear. I’d be glad to kiss you if you don’t mind.” I looked in her eyes and put my arm around her as I had before and kissed her. I kissed her hard and held her tight and tried to open her lips; they were closed tight. I was still angry and as I held her suddenly she shivered. I held her close against me and could feel her heart beating and her lips opened and her head went back against my hand and then she was crying on my shoulder. “Oh, darling,” she said. “You will be good to me, won’t you?
” What the hell, I thought. I stroked her hair and patted her shoulder.
She was crying.
“You will, won’t you?” She looked up at me. “Because we’re going to
have a strange life.””

—   Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms (via man-of-prose).
Keaton Henson - Petrichor

petrichor - keaton henson

pet·ri·chor: a pleasant smell that frequently accompanies the first rain after a long period of warm, dry weather

(Source: petalpunx, via itchy-living)

praetorium:

Gail Albert Halaban: Paris Views, courtesy of Edwynn Houk Gallery.

(Source: New York Magazine, via brown-soap-and-beer)

“You get a strange feeling when you’re about to leave a place, I told him, like you’ll not only miss the people you love but you’ll miss the person you are now at this time and this place, because you’ll never be this way ever again.”

—   Azar NafisiReading Lolita in Tehran.

(via man-of-prose)

Hiroshima mon amour.

Hiroshima mon amour.

(Source: nagasakysdream)

blue-voids:

Lorenzo Bartolini

“Perhaps I am no one.
True, I have a body
and I cannot escape from it.
I would like to fly out of my head,
but that is out of the question.”

—   Anne Sexton (via leslieseuffert)

(via leslieseuffert)

likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth
"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos. 
Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull. 
Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.
Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus's creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur. 
After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.
In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth

"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos.

Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull.

Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.

Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus's creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur.

After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.

In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

likeafieldmouse:
Todd McMillan - By the Sea (2004)

likeafieldmouse:

Todd McMillan - By the Sea (2004)

When I’m depressed, I’m willing to chase anything that has no ambition of staying. Women and parking spaces begin to look identical. I treat intimacy like a fire escape forgetting that eventually we both have to go home.

When you are lonely for this long, you stop calling it lonely.

You call it Tuesday.

—   Rudy Francisco (via chlo-spiration)

(via gioalexanderrr)